Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Best places to live...if you could sell your house


   I recently ran across a Web site touting the top 20 places for boomers to "thrive." The list looks good, but one has to wonder if anybody's doing much relocating these days.
   The "2009 Best Places to Thrive," according to Best Boomer Towns, are:
   Aiken, South Carolina
   Asheville, North Carolina
   Ashland, Oregon
   Athens, Georgia
   Bend, Oregon
   Camarillo, California
   Chapel Hill, North Carolina
   Charlottesville, Virginia
   Columbia, Missouri
   Danville, Kentucky
   Fort Collins, Colorado
   Las Cruces, New Mexico
   Maryville, Tennessee
   Paso Robles, California
   Pinehurst, North Carolina
   Prescott, Arizona
   Reno, Nevada
   St. George, Utah
   Tuscon, Arizona
   Villages, Florida
   Relocation wasn't in my future even before the recession. I'm content where I am, fortunately. But the "Top 20" offers a lot of nice places to visit, even if you don't want to live there.

3 comments:

Christine Menefee said...

Hi - My favorite was George Harrison, too! Though I became more of a John Lennon fan later. Now it's a toss-up.

I just came across your blog and it's great fun. I need to follow it; I tend to be much too serious in mine.

But you raise a good question there. Things have changed for those wanting to relocate, because of the dreary housing market. I'm an early Boomer and four years ago, at 58, when houses were still selling, I sold my Virginia house and used the proceeds to buy a condo in a (unique resident-run) community for over-55's called Mountain Meadows, in Ashland, Oregon, one of the towns recommended in the article.

Granted, I was lucky to sell my house before the market tanked, but I just wanted to comment that here, in the past few months, we've had quite a few new residents finding ways to live here despite the market, and a lot of them are in our age range.

One way to get around the housing slump is to rent. Some of the new residents here at Mountain Meadows are renting, which you can do here. So some people are renting their houses out until they can sell, and then renting a house or condo here until they can sell the old one and buy the one they're living in. Others who have bought here, I guess, were just able to buy a condo or house despite the market, and got tired of waiting. And it's a buyer's market.

Anyway, for anyone who CAN manage to sell or rent-out a house and relocate, this is a wonderful place for Boomers. Ashland is a fabulous town, and Mountain Meadows is a real community of interesting people and caring neighbors, a good environment especially if you're on your own, which a lot of us are by now.

Sorry if this sounds like an ad - it's not; I just live here and love the place and want to see more Boomers move here. (Though in disclosure, I do have a second condo to sell; but it's okay, it stays rented and I'm sure someone will buy it eventually.) But the thing is, I get discouraged when people my age think they're "not old enough" to consider a "retirement place" or that any over-55 community is an "old folks home." Grow up, Boomers!

Let's face it - most of us are in denial about aging, but when you can get over that, you realize that you have to deal with it. And when you get smart about that, you see that we boomers can reinvent how we do it. Which we're pioneering here. Come and visit and see how it works. We need to be doing this all over the country.

You can already see the boomers living here actively recreating the culture of our community to suit us (connectivity and social networking; home businesses and telecommuting - we might as well forget "retirement"!). And the article is right - Ashland is a great place to live in many ways.

Come see us!

Stew said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Stew said...

Uhm, okay, that is a pretty relative listing considering you did not point out any "value" or parameter why those places are out there. But I agree if I get a chance to sell my property under houses for rent in Northern Kentucky, that I will simply move in to Danville. For what's it worth, I'm sure you know why.