Monday, October 22, 2012

For sale: Beaten biscuit brake

Apparently, I have something very rare. No, it's not a disease; it's an antique beaten biscuit brake (machine?) which I volunteered to take from my mother's basement a few years back, thinking I might turn it into something else. I didn't. Now,  I'm thinking of selling it, but there are precious few similar machines on the Interweb, so it's tough to get a handle on what I've got. Are there any BoomerGirl readers who might know what a Lincoln beaten biscuit brake is worth? I don't want to wait for Antiques Roadshow to roll through town. My garage is getting crowded. Thanks.

14 comments:

Cath Pete said...

You could try to email Mike & Frank from the American Pickers show on the History Channel. Maybe they would make an offer. They have stores in Iowa & Nashville. There is a website. Wouldn't hurt to try.

Cathy Hamilton said...

Thanks, CP. I'm not familiar with that show, but Iowa's fairly close. I'll give it a shot.

Carol Starr Schneider said...

I checked. It's worth one million dollars. Hello, Sotheby's!

George Cohn said...

How much you want for it Cathy?

Cathy Hamilton said...

George, I am still researching prices. Hard to get good comps because they're so rare. In the meantime, will entertain offers.

Jonathan Sutton said...

I only see one for sale each year online. The ones with marble tops tend to go for $400-500, while the biscuit brakes with a wooden top sell for half that, sometime a little more.

It doesn't seem to matter if it's hand crank, or converted to electric, the prices tend to stay strong either way.

And prices are for "in good working order." Brakes that are not functional sell for about 10-15% of the value of one that works.

George Formaro said...

Cathy, have you decided on a price ? I am interested if you have.

Treva Clardy said...

My husband and I have a marble top beaten biscuit. He and his family voted to throw it away and I begged for it. I didn't even know what it was. Took me 20 years before I got it. It has a tin cover that goes over the beater and has the biscuit recipe with it. The Clardy family said this was used to make hardtack during the civil war.
Treva Clardy

Treva Clardy said...

Note marble top beaten biscuit maker and it's on a stand like a treadle sewing machine.
Treva Clardy

Lakeport Plantation said...

Nice. We have a very similar Lincoln biscuit maker on loan to our museum

There is a picture of ours in one of the albums in this blog post
http://lakeportplantation.blogspot.com/2012/12/gifts-of-2012.html

Elizabeth said...

Cathy,

Please let me know what you find out. I have a similar table. It has a marble top and a cast iron roller and base with the company name "Lincoln" worked into the cast iron on either end. It comes from Kentucky, originally. I had asked my grandmother for it hoping to continue making beaten biscuits, but after a shoulder surgery it's too difficult to use, so I think I may sell it. I did read somewhere that they were used mainly in the VA tri-state area, and I've found that antique dealers in New England don't have a clue what to think of it!

Elizabeth

Elizabeth Berkenkamp said...

I am interested in your biscuit brake also is it still for sale? If so, do you have a sale price?

Anonymous said...

Is there an update? My grandmother lived in coastal NC. I remember eating beaten biscuits. I was born in 1956 so that should give you and approximate age of the machine. I also remember seeing them "beaten" with a tool that looked like an axe handle before the machine arrived. I LOVE these biscuits with a thin slice of VA ham. I am interested too if the maker works.

gasang4223@yahoo.com said...

Hello!! I am a retired guy who is a hobby cook from Georgia. I grew up with beaten biscuits on Sundays. I would like to buy your machine, if you are ever thinking of selling it. E-mail me at gasang4223@yahoo.com