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Nutritional intervention for Alzheimer's Disease

I told my new doctor that my two long-term health goals were 1) to not have a stroke like my father, his brother and both parents had; and 2) avoid Alzheimer's disease which, tragically, struck my maternal grandmother around the age of 65.  Now, comes a new book, "The Alzheimer's Diet"(which I will review later) that offers a brain-healthy diet that will benefit anyone who's over 40, has a family history of AD, or is experiencing problems with memory. Here are 11 tips from the book by Harvard-trained neurologist Richard Isaacson MD and Christopher Ochner PhD:

1. Proportion your macronutrients. Every day, make sure that you aim for 25% of your total calories from fat (but less than 7% saturated, or "bad" fat); 30-45% from complex carbohydrates (fruits, vegetables and whole foods that are low on the glycemic index); and 25-35% from high-quality lean protein.

2. Wean yourself off high-glycemic carbs. These include sugars, high-fructose corn syrup, processed cereals and grains, anything baked, ice cream and sorbet, crackers, salty snacks such as chips and pretzels, and anything made with white flour.

3. Eat Mediterranean style. A brain-healthy Mediterranean-style diet includes fruits and vegetables, lean protein (fish, chicken, and turkey); low-fat yogurt and cheeses; and nuts and seeds. Stay away from red meat and processed foods.

4. Have more good fat and less bad. Brain foods high in good fats include: olive oil, avocados, certain nuts, natural peanut butter, certain seeds, and certain fish. Foods high in bad, or saturated, fat include: most fast foods, anything hydrogenated, dried coconut, butter, animal fats, milk chocolate and white chocolate, and cheese.


5. Boost your omega-3 intake. Omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) are essential for memory function and brain health. Most of us don't get enough from dietary sources (such as fish), so consider high-quality, pure fish oil supplements that contain a minimum of 250 mg of DHA in each capsule, and aim for 1,000-1,500 mg of DHA daily if approved by the treating physician.

6. Feed your brain antioxidants. Antioxidant-rich foods are great for mental function. Some of the best are berries, kale, 100% pure unsweetened cocoa powder, mushrooms, onions, beans, seeds, sardines, herring, trout, and Alaskan wild salmon.

7. Consume enough brain vitamins. Ensure adequate intake of folic acid, B6, B12, and vitamin D in particular. If you're not eating vitamin-rich foods on a regular basis, it's good to supplement as needed in pill or liquid form.

8. Choose whole foods. In general, whole foods have only one ingredient--for example, strawberries, broccoli, or barley. If you must have a convenience (manufactured) food on occasion, find those packaged, canned, and frozen items with the fewest ingredients--especially ingredients that you readily recognize and understand.

9. Opt for low- or nonfat dairy. Any recipe you make with full-fat milk, cheese, or yogurt can be made with nonfat versions. If you drink whole milk or half-and-half in your coffee, try mixing it with skim milk and increasing the proportion of no fat to high fat every day. Pretty soon you'll be used to it and never have the urge to go back.

10. Enjoy a cup or two of Joe. Caffeinated coffee, 1-3 cups early in the day, may be beneficial over time to your brain. Studies done in Europe over several years demonstrate that men who drank coffee regularly for many years showed less of a decline on memory tests than those who did not drink coffee.

11. Fast 12 hours at night. If you routinely wake up at 6 a.m., try to eat your last meal at 6 p.m. the night before. There is scientific evidence that substances called ketone bodies, which are produced when there are no carbohydrates to burn for fuel, may have a protective effect on brain cells.

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